spring hill reservoirs: the weight of light

I’ve been fascinated by the Spring Hill Reservoirs in inner-city Brisbane for some time.

The first reservoir was built in 1871, and the second just metres from the first some eleven years after. Both were built primarily of red-brick and mortar, set in-ground. Interiors feature columns and arches between walls for reinforcement. At the time of planning, Spring Hill was considered to be the ideal location for a Brisbane water source, due to its elevation above most of what is now Brisbane CBD. Water was sourced from Enoggera Dam via gravity feed. They were built in 1871 and 1882 by Henry Holmes. They serviced water to what is now Brisbane City until 1962. Currently, the reservoirs are covered by three hut-like structures above ground. For many years the reservoirs were locked and inaccessible to the public. However, since 2014, they are used occasionally for cultural events.

I’ve been waiting for a ‘cultural event’ in the reservoirs so I was lucky enough to find out about a light exhibition by artist Meagan Streader, The Weight of Light, being held in the reservoirs.

So last Thursday we picked the boys up from school and visited the reservoirs at Spring Hill. I’m not sure what I was more impressed by: exploring centuries old underground reservoirs or the neon light art exhibition within the darkness. It was a very memorable experience – particularly as we were the only people in there initially.

I can’t wait to revisit – it seems there is another art installation planned for the reservoirs as part of Brisbane Open House on October 7 – that’s definitely on the must-do list!

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Al

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