bookshelves arranged by colour (for conference calls)

Quite often I will be on a conference call and one of the participants will have bookshelves arranged neatly by colour behind them as they participate. This inevitably gets favourable comments: it’s a good way to impress your colleagues and acquaintances!

I thought about doing this, but I have a few issues:

  1. I don’t own enough physical books to fill a bookshelf: Marie Kondo says I shouldn’t own a single thing that doesn’t spark joy and there aren’t enough physical books in the world that will continually spark me joy to justify a dedicated bookshelf.
  2. Even if I did own enough physical books to fill a bookshelf I’d probably not have enough colour diversity in the spine of the books to be able to neatly separate them into colours – so I’d definitely be buying books I didn’t need, or even want.
  3. Even if I did have enough colour diversity in my books I would be hesitant to actually sort my books by their colour as that would mean prioritising form (colour) over function (subject matter): I find it much easier to find a book amongst a section of ‘business’ books than to find a book by remembering what colour spine it has.

I want the end goal of impressing my colleagues with my colour arranged bookshelf without the hard work and struggle of owning and organising a collection of books by colour.

So what I thought about doing is starting a Kickstarter campaign for a large photo-printed canvas blind with colour arranged bookshelves on it that you arrange behind your desk so each conference call people can see all your fancy colour books arranged so lovingly.

Or I could just stop caring what people think of me; that’s a much easier option.

(image via Fuck Your Noguchi Coffee Table)

📚 the boiling river

I recently finished The Boiling River: Adventure and Discovery in The Amazon—a TED book by Andrés Ruzo. I love the short format and interestingness of these books, this one was no exception.

“At a time when everything seems mapped, measured, and understood, this river challenges what we /think/ we know. It has forced me to question the line between known and unknown, ancient and modern, scientific and spiritual. It is a reminder that there are still great wonders to be discovered. We find them not just in the black void of the unknown but in the white noise of everyday life—in the things we barely notice, the things we almost forget, even in the detail of a story.”

“My headlamp concentrates my focus on the small area it illuminates and makes the darkness beyond seem impenetrable. I contemplate the marvels that must be out there, shrouded in darkness or hidden in the everyday. That is the lesson of the darkness: it is our perspective that draws the line between the known and the unknown, the sacred and the trivial, the things we take for granted and the things we have yet to discover.”

we tell stories to children for many reasons…

“We tell stories to children for many reasons, and if the goal is to teach them a moral lesson then one way to make the lesson more accessible to children is to use human characters. Yes, we should consider the diversity of story characters and the roles they are depicted in”

Patricia Ganea, from the University of Toronto on why having all the animals in most children’s books isn’t such a great idea after all.