buy nothing new in january

I’m still recovering from the consumeristic binge that is known as Christmas, so I proposed to Kitty that we make a family pledge to ‘buy nothing new’ in 2017. 

Kitty, being the wise lady she is, suggested we trial it for January which is a great idea as it’ll maximise our chance of success and see whether this is something we can sustain longer term. 

So for January 2017 we’re planning not to buy any new items like toys, clothes, books, games etc. 

The last time I didn’t buy anything for a month was October in 2010 and it worked out well. 

If there’s something we need we will buy secondhand either through thrift/op shops (preferable) or eBay/Gumtree. 

We’ll still be buying essential groceries from the store, and there’s a couple of items that we don’t think we can do second hand like some school uniforms (that we can’t find in the second hand store at school), and underwear. 

Luckily Lifeline Bookfest happens in January which will cover all our book needs (with our regular library borrowing). 

We also have kerbside collection in January which means we’ll (hopefully) be able to get rid of a few household things so here’s hoping for a net ‘stuff’ loss over the month of January.

twenty years

Twenty years ago this evening my fifteen year old self went on my very first date with a lovely girl from my high school. Little did I know that night would change my life forever. Thanks for asking me out that night Kitty and thanks for a fantastic twenty years together. Here’s to the next twenty!

→ a toast: to sobriety

I enjoyed this article by Bernard Salt on modern Australian teetotalism:

“The benefits of not drinking alcohol over a sustained period are many. I am sure I have saved thousands of dollars by only drinking water (or soda water if it is a special occasion) and that my health is better. I also think it’s a good idea for people who attend a lot of events for work purposes to remain clear-headed
But there is a problem. I don’t like the term teetotaller. It is a hangover (no pun intended) of the tut-tutting temperance movement of the 19th century. And I don’t see myself as a tut-tutter. I see myself as a modern, liberal-thinking progressive sort of person who prefers to drink water. What the teetotaller tribe needs is a market makeover based around a groovy new phrase that emphasises the wellness benefits of drinking water.

I am not a teetotaller, then. I’m a non-toxin drinker. I am a waterist. In fact, I am a bit of a water courter: I seek it out.”

I’d happily call myself a waterist; water is life.