buy experiences, not things

Over the past decade, an abundance of psychology research has shown that experiences bring people more happiness than do possessions.

Essentially, when you can’t live in a moment, they say, it’s best to live in anticipation of an experience. Experiential purchases like trips, concerts, movies, et cetera, tend to trump material purchases because the utility of buying anything really starts accruing before you buy it.

Waiting for an experience apparently elicits more happiness and excitement than waiting for a material good (and more “pleasantness” too—an eerie metric). By contrast, waiting for a possession is more likely fraught with impatience than anticipation.

source

A 8 year-old friend of junior pixels recently told him at school that our family doesn’t have many toys because we go on holidays all the time. I initially didn’t know what to think when I heard him recount this, but I am since proud of that fact.

→ how can I make my life simpler?

Answered by Patrick Mathieson on Quora

  1. Have a routine that you use to start your day that becomes automatic and thoughtless.
  2. Selectively avoid tasks that you suspect may be unimportant.
  3. Reduce the number of ways people can reach you.
  4. Get comfortable not having an opinion on most things.
  5. Remember that in 200 years, it’s very likely that nobody alive will know that you ever existed

Worth a read.

Also this, and this, and this.

sriracha?

David Tran, who operates his family-owned Huy Fong Foods out of a 650,000-square-foot facility in Irwindale, doesn’t see his failure to secure a trademark for his Sriracha sauce as a missed opportunity. He says it’s free advertising for a company that’s never had a marketing budget.

The story of Sriracha and how its lack of trademark helps it.

→ when i’m gone

WHEN YOU BECOME A FATHER

Now you’ll understand what real love is, son. You’ll realize how much you love her, but real love is something you’ll feel for this little thing over there. I don’t know if it’s a boy or a girl. I’m just a corpse, I’m not a fortune teller.

Have fun. It’s a great thing. Time is gonna fly now, so make sure you’ll be around. Never miss a moment, they never come back. Change diapers, bathe the baby, be a role model to this child. I think you have what it takes to be an amazing father, just like me.

From a story about a father who dies young and leaves his eight and a half old son a series of letters to open at life events.

Whilst the story reads like a true story, it’s actually fiction.

 

removed

“The joining of people to devices has been rapid and unalterable. The application of the personal device in daily life has made tasks take less time. Far away places and people feel closer than ever before. Despite the obvious benefits that these advances in technology have contributed to society, the social and physical implications are slowly revealing themselves. In similar ways that photography transformed the lived experience into the photographable, performable, and reproducible experience, personal devices are shifting behaviors while simultaneously blending into the landscape by taking form as being one with the body. This phantom limb is used as a way of signaling busyness and unapproachability to strangers while existing as an addictive force that promotes the splitting of attention between those who are physically with you and those who are not.”

Very thought provoking.

→ why you shouldn’t say ‘you’re welcome’

The script is so deeply ingrained that you don’t even need to think about it. When you do a favor, and someone says “thank you,” the automatic response is “you’re welcome.” It’s a basic rule of politeness, and it signals that you accept the expression of gratitude — or that you were happy to help.

But according to one leading psychologist, this isn’t the best choice of words. After four decades of studying persuasion, Influence author Robert Cialdini has come to see “you’re welcome” as a missed opportunity. “There is a moment of power that we are all afforded as soon as someone has said ‘thank you,’” Cialdini explains. To capitalize on this power, he recommends an unconventional reply:

“I know you’d do the same for me.”

Interesting