camels!

Last Sunday we went on an afternoon drive to the scenic rim to visit Lake Moogerah for a picnic. On the way Kitty spotted a sign for a Camel Farm and Diary so we stopped on the way home, of course. Summer Land Camel Farm only opens Sundays from 9:30 to 4 and has a cafe and an area where you can get up close and feed the camels – we all loved it so much!

 

 

mount mitchell (main range national park)

Mount Mitchell sits on the southern side of Cunningham’s Gap in the Main Range National Park. There are some excellent views of Mount Cordeau to the north whilst walking to the peak and the peak itself is a cosy rocky little area covered in grass trees with fantastic views East, South and West. I loved sitting up here and reading a book in the sun and having a cup of tea all to myself. A great walk with an awesome summit so would do it again 😊

Distance: 10.5km return
Time up: 1h:13m
Time down: 53m
Elevation: 1174m
Elevation Gain: 381m

petrichor

petrichor - 1

It hasn’t rained in Brisbane for a long time. This evening I was coming home and smelt petrichor and smiled: our new house is much closer to a large bushland reserve and the petrichor is more pungent.

What is petrichor you ask?

(pretrichor is) used to describe the distinct scent of rain in the air. Or, to be more precise, it’s the name of an oil that’s released from the earth into the air before rain begins to fall.

The word was invented by the CSIRO in Australia.

spring hill reservoirs: the weight of light

I’ve been fascinated by the Spring Hill Reservoirs in inner-city Brisbane for some time.

The first reservoir was built in 1871, and the second just metres from the first some eleven years after. Both were built primarily of red-brick and mortar, set in-ground. Interiors feature columns and arches between walls for reinforcement. At the time of planning, Spring Hill was considered to be the ideal location for a Brisbane water source, due to its elevation above most of what is now Brisbane CBD. Water was sourced from Enoggera Dam via gravity feed. They were built in 1871 and 1882 by Henry Holmes. They serviced water to what is now Brisbane City until 1962. Currently, the reservoirs are covered by three hut-like structures above ground. For many years the reservoirs were locked and inaccessible to the public. However, since 2014, they are used occasionally for cultural events.

I’ve been waiting for a ‘cultural event’ in the reservoirs so I was lucky enough to find out about a light exhibition by artist Meagan Streader, The Weight of Light, being held in the reservoirs.

So last Thursday we picked the boys up from school and visited the reservoirs at Spring Hill. I’m not sure what I was more impressed by: exploring centuries old underground reservoirs or the neon light art exhibition within the darkness. It was a very memorable experience – particularly as we were the only people in there initially.

I can’t wait to revisit – it seems there is another art installation planned for the reservoirs as part of Brisbane Open House on October 7 – that’s definitely on the must-do list!

yerra-bin king island

Yesterday we visited Wellington Point, about 30 minutes drive from Brisbane, for a family picnic. Just north of Wellington Point sits a small island known as ‘Yerra-bin’ or King Island. During a low tide you can walk across the sand bar to the island. Fortunately the tide was low and we walked over and back in time for a play at the playground and a cup of tea using our new family sized Thermos.